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How Generative Questions Can Transform Young Lives

Episode Introduction

In this episode, I’m speaking with one of my heros in the Appreciative Inquiry (AI) space, Dr. Jackie Stavros.  Jackie is perhaps most celebrated for her creation of SOAR, a strengths-based strategy framework, grounded in Appreciative Inquiry.  For that reason, she really needs no, or, very little introduction.

Jackie happily talks with me about her AI back story – how both her dad and first boss asked generative questions to have her consider how she might be the author of her own life from a very early age.  That early influence, being asked great questions, primed her to embrace AI with great ease when she was more formally introduced to it as a graduate student.  Next, I invite Jackie to talk about the SOAR framework, and the impact of that strategic planning framework around the world.  Finally, we talk about her newest book, and the joys of co-authoring.  

Episode Background

Generative Questions Jackie Stavros Head shotI’ve had the privilege to work with Jackie on a number of projects and, from personal experiences, she is wonderfully generous and kind, thoughtful, hardworking and innovative. Jackie’s passion comes across as she connects with others helping them to discover their strengths and create individual and collective opportunities, so they can produce results for positive change and flourish with confidence!

Jackie, is a full-time professor for the College of Management at Lawrence Technological University, and has been there for 17 years.  She says it’s been easy because her values and the university’s values align, so coming to work is fun.  Not only is Jackie researching and teaching all levels of students, from undergraduate to doctoral, she’s also out there in industry teaching, training, coaching and consulting, and writing books.

Her Dad Asked Generative Questions

Her dad, through his generative questions inspired Jackie to create her own solutions and  to take some responsibility for her own future.  Through his kind and attentive nurturing, she was able to find solutions to her own inquiries.  One example resulted in getting a job at 15, teaching kids to swim because at that time swimming was one of her strengths.  Her first boss, who gave her that job also asked truly generative questions.  Between these two caring influencers in her early life, she was able to earn money at a young age to get her to college until she earned a scholarship.

Appreciative Inquiry in Life

When Jackie finally met Professors David Cooperrider and Ron Fry to begin her doctoral studies, learning about AI and its focus on generative questions, it felt so natural.

Jackie talks about the power of Appreciative Inquiry in her personal life, especially as a wife and mother.  She shares one beautiful story that illustrates the strength and stickability of Appreciative inquiry.  A potentially hard conversation with her daughter opened up a whole new inquiry framed in Appreciative Inquiry that served the situation really well. Some days later, she overhead her daughter use the exact same approach with her younger brother to produce the same positive, expansive outcomes.   It was one of the quiet fist pumping moments and a mouthing of “yes”, I imagine. 

SOAR – the Strengths-Based Strategic Planning Framework

Generative questions - SOAR book coverIt was so exciting to hear Jackie talk about the genesis of SOAR.  It was conceived around her kitchen table with a client, the Senior VP in the automobile industry.   As a result of her client not wanting to use the same “old” tools to produce the same “old” results in strategic planning meetings, Jackie asked many “what if” questions which led to a drawing on the back of a napkin that became SOAR.

The acronym SOAR stands for Strengths, Opportunities, Aspirations and Results.  It is the strengths-based approach to building strategy with all organizational stakeholders having a voice in identifying and articulating their values, visions and mission statements, setting strategy, and strategic initiatives.  As SOAR is a whole systems approach, all stakeholders are invited to participate in planning the strategy.  The experience serves also to build collaborative teams who co-create actions to bring about results people care about.

SOAR is grounded in the principles, process and practices of Appreciative Inquiry.

Alongside the growth of AI around the world, SOAR is right there tracking along side.

Being and Doing – Living the AI Principles

What is clear throughout this conversation with Jackie is her living in the Principles of Appreciative Inquiry.  As Jackie shares her stories, she very frequently refers to certain principles to illustrate how they are so integrated into the being of an AI practitioner.  The principles live through us in how we think, act and feel.  

Towards the end of the espisode, when Jackie excitedly talks about her new book, Conversations Worth Having: Using Appreciative Inquiry to Fuel Productive and Meaningful Engagement, she illustrates so perfectly why she prefers to co-author in her writing.  She's living the Principle of Social Construction – we generate meaning together through language and our social relationships.  When I asked about the value of co-authoring, Jackie's response:

We socially construct everything.  I don’t like to write alone because it’s just me and my ideas. Being in conversation with my co-authors you just create something you never even imagined. 

Jackie talked with great energy about valuing the diversity and inclusive nature of co-creating anything.  I'm so excited about the new co-creation – their new book coming out in May!

Such an inspiration!

Stay Connected with Jackie

Jackie’s Website:  Soar Strategy

Jackie’s Bio Page at Lawrence Technical University (LTU) College of Management

Jackie on LinkedIn

Jackie on Facebook

Links to Mentioned Papers and Books

AI Is Not (Just) About The Positive  – Gervase Bushe in OD Practitioner

World Positive Education Accelerator – Global Positive Education Summit June 2018

Stavros, J. M., Godwin, L.N., & Cooperrider, D.L. (2016). Chapter 6: Appreciative inquiry: Organization development and the strengths revolution. In J. W. Rothwell, J. M. Stavros, & R. L. Sullivan, Practicing organization development: Leading transformation and change (4th ed., pp. 96-116). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons.


Let's Stay Connected

It's always great to hear from you. Please connect with me to ask questions or leave comments about this episode or the podcast in general, and there are several good ways to do this:

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I would be extremely appreciative if you would subscribe, rate or review our Positivity Strategist podcast. Your ratings and comments will help a lot to spread the message! Here is a guide to writing a quick review, click on iTunes and Stitcher.

 

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What are the New Literacies for living well in the 21st century?

Episode Introduction

In this episode, my esteemed guest, organizational designer and systems thinker, Sallie Lee walks us through six new literacies that in the 21st century everyone needs. Some think that these literacies are most appropriate for leaders of organizations, but they will work in any set of circumstances in our complex world.  These new literacies were published in a chapter of the book, Lawyers as Changemakers: Integrative Law Movement (2017), by J.Kim Wright.  It also stands alone as a paper, entitled Leadership/Citizenship Literacies for the 21st Century: Solution and System Stalking

Episode Background

new literacies - Sallie LeeSallie Lee has spent her career in organizational design, serving as a thinking partner, facilitator, coach and strategist for a global client base ranging from 5-person to 500,000-person organizations. She is known for bringing vision, clarity of purpose, and innovation to all her work in organizational design, leadership coaching and workshop facilitation  all over the world.

As an internationally acclaimed Appreciative Inquiry practitioner and trainer, Sally helps leaders stalk solutions to questions such as

“How do we design organizations so we get the results we want? How do we design our work together with a focus on our relationships?”

Early Influencers

As a child, Sallie remembers that she found herself facilitating her family members and identifying the patterns in their family dynamics.  She admired her uncle who traveled the world as an international banker, and followed his example to creating her own opportunities to experience different cultures around the world.

As she grew her own career in organization development and design, Sallie pursed  different methodologie and genres.  When she discovered Appreciative Inquiry over 20 years ago, she described it as an answer to a prayer. Her facilitation took on a whole new career… lifted her out of the lethargy… it was life changing.

Solution and System Stalking

The paper Sallie references in this episode is littered with alliterations, as you quickly learn from the names of the six literacies.  Her subtitle, “Solution and System Stalking” is such an alliteration..  I inquired about the word “stalking.”  Listen in to hear Sallie’s response. In a nutshell, the solutions we seek are already within our systems and we have to ferret them out.  I love this quote from her paper:  

“A true invitation to collective dialogue builds on the belief that the answers to important questions walk into the room in the form of participants and emerge in combining their intelligence and intent.”

Defining Literacies

In doing my research before interviewing Sallie, I came across this definition of “literacy” from the National Council of Teachers of English website: .

“Literacy has always been a collection of cultural and communicative practices shared among members of particular groups. As society and technology change, so does literacy. Because technology has increased the intensity and complexity of literate environments, the 21st century demands that a literate person possess a wide range of abilities and competencies, many literacies. These literacies are multiple, dynamic, and malleable. As in the past, they are inextricably linked with particular histories, life possibilities, and social trajectories of individuals and groups.”

Literacies change with time.  Each generation develops sets of skills, competencies and tools that are central to our survival in our respective times.

In the 21st century, with our increasing complexities, where traditional regimes are struggling to stay relevant, we no longer listen to  one dominant voice, or conform to one dominant homogeneous culture, new leadership and citizenship literacies are required if we are to muddle our way through to the next meme.

New Literacies for the 21st Century

Reframing Reality

The literacy to be able to step outside our individual framing of  the world, to seek to understand another’s framing  and potentially stepping together into a bigger frame.

Managing Multiplicity

The literacy to see wholeness, to appreciate our world is teeming with diversity.  To get to the best we can be, we need to embrace multiple perspectives and dance with diversity.

Connecting the Collective

The literacy to invite others into dialogue and have processes to tap into all the voices that can contribute experience and wisdom to promote cooperation and collaboration.

Forecasting the Future

The literacy to be able to imagine and design what the future is calling for and to anticipate and project ourselves into novelty and possible futures.

Designing Dynamics

The literacy to be able to bring out the best in our humanity and all living systems to include those who may be outside the culture so they can contribute, innovate and celebrate.

Please listen to Sallie describe, give examples and share stories about each of these highly relevant 21st century literacies.

Among the Best Trained People on the Planet

For those of us who are grounded in Appreciative Inquiry, we recognize how AI is a foundational mindset with its  principles and practices that enable us to live, teach and facilitate such literacies within ourselves, our families, workplaces and communities.

We are among  the best trained people on the planet to bring these literacies to life.  We have these skills and literacies to be of service to others.  We are trained in designing the types of conversations that bring out the co-creative capacities of togetherness, interdependency and collaboration.  We recognize our world is socially constructed through our language and our relational processes. 

We need to step up and step into these literacies to model what good leadership and citizenship can accomplish together.

Four Beautiful Assumptions about Humankind

The above life literacies are founded on a set of positive assumptions about humankind, and with such a solid foundation, we know what we can do together.

We’re not as selfish as we’ve been taught to believe we are.

    • We have a huge capacity for good, as history shows.

Humans have the ability to learn what we need to learn.

    • Neuroplasticity is real – we can sculpt our brains and change the way we think.

We are interconnected and interdependent.

    • We are all in this together. We are living systems, everything is relational – we cannot disconnect from that.

One of our greatest gifts as humans is our insatiable curiosity.

    • We are information eaters – data grows as does our appetite.

Connect with Sallie

The best way to connect with Sallie is on LinkedIn, especially if you'd like a copy of her paper, Leadership/Citizenship Literacies for the 21st Century: Solution and System Stalking.

A second paper:  Positive Problem Solving: How Appreciative Inquiry Works 


 Let's Stay Connected

It's always great to hear from you. Please connect with me to ask questions or leave comments about this episode or the podcast in general, and there are several good ways to do this:

  • Share your questions and ideas on the Podcast Feedback page
  • Leave a voice message here, and we may feature your question on an upcoming episode
  • Leave a comment on the show notes below

Help Spread the Message of Positivity!

I would be extremely appreciative if you would subscribe, rate or review our Positivity Strategist podcast. Your ratings and comments will help a lot to spread the message! Here is a guide to writing a quick review, click on iTunes and Stitcher.

 

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  • I'd love it if you can leave a quick review, on iTunes and Stitcher.

Personal Reflections on Appreciative Voice – PS 72

Episode Introduction

This show is a little different from my usual format because I’m flying solo, except for a special guest, Mary Jane Dieter who shares a story illustrating a challenging exchange with a neighbor that resulted in good outcomes because of how she chose to speak with him. It’s a story that illustrates appreciative voice.

In this episode, I focus on how we can grow and strengthen our appreciative voice through the principles and practices of Appreciative Inquiry and what it can do for us individually and collectively.

Episode Background

To learn more about the inspiration for this show, please check out my blog What is Appreciative Voice in Your World?  

I participated in the Appreciative Inquiry (AI) Homecoming at the David L. Cooperrider Center for Appreciative Inquiry at Champlain College in Burlington Vt.  We were around 40 – 50 people mainly from US and Canada.  Most of us were familiar with AI

We gathered in response to the following invitation.

Invitation to the AI Homecoming

AI was made for these turbulent times.  This year our theme is one that can’t be ignored: voicing the appreciative–in conversation, in media, in public forums, in organizational life, in community. How do we create space and opportunity for conversations across divides, across borders, across values and visions that can help create the world we want to live in? How do we contribute? How do we create space and opportunity to co-create with others?

Inquiry into Appreciative voice

The first question put to us was:

What voices are coming through?

This question had us go deep very quickly.  

We reflected that it’s easy to block out messages coming through channels we don’t want to hear because our technologies allow us to. This enables us to live in echo chambers or bubbles,  meaning we stay with what we know and close ourselves off from hearing the perspectives of others who are not like us.

Living in the bubble limits us from exercising our appreciative voice.

When we come from inquiry we open up to listen to others  and when we live in inquiry we are less likely to jump to judgment.  You’ll hear that Mary Jane Dieter’s story is a great example of being true to her voice and at the same time curious and open to a different voice.

Four Compelling Questions

  1. When has your voice made a positive difference?
  2. When has your voice as part of a group made a positive difference?
  3. Recall a movement that made a positive difference in the world?
  4. When has an individual voice made a positive difference in the world in business/technology/education/ or any domain?

These questions focused our inquiry and they are typical of an appreciative inquiry.  As you listen to this show, you’ll find out how these appreciatively framed questions work in bringing out the best in us.  AI is one of the fastest and most enduring way that I know results in high quality human connection.  

Asking Appreciative Questions is Easy

We can all do this.  It is not hard to learn how to ask questions that focus on what works in a situation.  Many things go wrong, there is evil, there is hardship, there are natural disasters, and entangled in the chaos there are things that also offer redemption.  

Bob Marley’s lyrics in his Redemption Song say it all.

Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery

None but ourselves can free our minds

 

Appreciative Inquiry Guiding Principles

Appreciative Inquiry Principles offer us a framework to practice our appreciative voice so we can bring more of it to the world.  The guiding principles that help us connect with others in ways that serve not only ourselves but others, too.  

Constructionist Principle: Words create worlds

Appreciative Voice sunflowers - communication skills trainingPrinciple of Simultaneity: The very first question starts the change

Poetic Principle: What we focus on grows

Anticipatory Principle: Image inspires action

Positive Principle: Positive affect leads to positive action

Wholeness Principle: We are in this together

Narrative: Stories transform us

Enactment: Embody what we want

Readings

“The self is a style of being, continually expanding in a vital process of definition, affirmation, revision, and growth, a process that is the image, we may say, of the life process of a healthy society itself.”  

Robert Penn Warren

Self-love is the foundation of a sane society, our responsibility to ourselves — and to our selves — is really a responsibility to one another: to know our interiority intimately and hold our darkest sides up to the light of awareness. But part of our human folly is that we do this far less readily than we shine the scorching beam of blameful attention on the darknesses of other.  

Maria Popova referencing Erich Fromm

The full article by Mari Popova of Brainpickings is The Terror Within and the Evil Without: James Baldwin on Our Capacity for Transformation as Individuals and Nations  

One workshop can be transformative. One single positive experience, when we discover a latent talent or potential strength or experience a gesture of caring, can be transformative. In fact, the very first question asked, and the way it is asked, begins the change process. When we open ourselves to our best selves, envision possibilities, and get in touch with our strengths, a paradigmatic, seismic, quantum shift can happen in the blink of an eye.

Robyn Stratton-Berkessel, Appreciative Inquiry for Collaborative Solutions. 

Books

 Let's Stay Connected

It's always great to hear from you. Please connect with me to ask questions or leave comments about this episode or the podcast in general, and there are several good ways to do this:

  • Share your questions and ideas on the Podcast Feedback page
  • Leave a voice message here, and we may feature your question on an upcoming episode
  • Leave a comment on the show notes below

Help Spread the Message of Positivity!

I would be extremely appreciative if you would subscribe, rate or review our Positivity Strategist podcast. Your ratings and comments will help a lot to spread the message! Here is a guide to writing a quick review, click on iTunes and Stitcher.

 

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If this episode was helpful or enjoyable to you,

  • I invite you to share it using the social media buttons on the bottom of this page.
  • I'd love it if you can leave a quick review, on iTunes and Stitcher.

What is an Appreciative Voice in Your World?

Your Voice is Silenced

Has there been a time in your life when you felt you lost your voice, or you had no voice, or your voice was not listened to?  Your voice was silenced. At such times, it seems your voice does not count. As a consequence of feeling discounted, there is a sense of also being invisible. You might say you feel even powerless.

I’ve felt like that in some meetings; in some face-to-face situations, with certain people, even in personal relationships, when I felt my voice didn’t matter.  My contribution wasn’t important.  My thoughts and feelings were dismissed or were patronised.

I’ve also been in conversations when I did not honor the voice of the person I was with. My behavior signaled their voice did not matter, and they, too  felt discounted, unimportant, invisible.  It happens in groups, in teams, in social gatherings.  As an example, in networking or community gatherings, the person you are speaking with has no eye contact with you and no animation in their face, until they spot someone they do want to engage with, and you're abandoned.

Being silenced can occur when you're in company and you're telling a story, then suddenly you're interrupted by a person with a story of their own because they believe they have a more interesting story that trumps yours. There is a big difference between being interested and being interesting.

While the shrill voices seem to be getting shriller, what might we offer to redress the balance and bring some of the quieter, gentler or lost voices into the conversation?

Might an Appreciative Voice be an Antidote?

I want to offer some reflections on how cultivating an appreciative voice not only strengthens you and expands your world, it also strengthens others and expands their worlds.

This topic comes to me following my participation at the AI Homecoming David Cooperrider Center for Appreciative Inquiry at Champlain College in Burlington VT, co-hosted by the Center and The Taos Institute.

Appreciative Voice - age diversityOver three days, we workshopped together. We shared stories, asked questions, inquired into each other’s experiences, listened to, and discovered a host of innovations that practitioners and researchers are bringing into, and growing the practice of Appreciative Inquiry all over the world.  We listened to voices that had been at the edge and in the center;  those that are new and young, and those that are wise and seasoned.

As we experience the worldview of Appreciative Inquiry we are able to be deeply appreciative with ourselves and each other.  Our practice is to come from “inquiry” which opens us to intimacies and vulnerabilities because we consciously create a safe space to be in conversation and contemplation with others.

What is Life Giving about Appreciative Voice?

In a nutshell, the appreciative voice seeks to include and understand .  “Appreciative” is valuing, so a voice that is appreciative comes from an intention of seeking to value what it will hear;  it continues to inquire and is curious about learning more.  An appreciative voice is present to listen respectfully.  It is grounded and spacious, and non-judging.

An appreciative voice provides safety for others to speak their truths.  It is invitational and watchful.  An appreciative voice is unhurried and patient.  It can reframe situations to be helpful and resourceful.  It is flexible.  The appreciative voice is inclusive. It acknowledges diversity and identifies opportunities to offer possibilities to hold the space for transformational shifts to emerge.

Appreciative Voice - young girls talking on beach

The appreciative voice seeks to make meaning of the world in dialogue and in relationship with others.  The appreciative voice can expand knowledge, and build potential shared understanding.

For sure, the appreciative voice helps participants develop their own thoughts and feelings in a way that helps them see themselves in new ways.

A question that lingers is:

What happens when we refrain from using our appreciative voice?

My grandmother stressed to me: “It’s better to say nothing at all that say something negative or hurtful.” And that has been my default operating system.  Yet, in our society today my sense is that by being silent is not always the most helpful way, because if we choose to keep silent and not exercise our appreciative voice, we are not serving ourselves or others, and therefore not able to make any positive difference.

In using our appreciative voice, by framing our opinions as inquiry, we open up the space for dialogue and learning, providing the opportunity for more voices to be heard.  As Mo McKenna shared in her interview:  We do no harm in asking people what’s working for them. In asking what works for them, we are using our appreciative voice and open up the possibility for building understanding.

Appreciative Voice Guided by Principles

The appreciative voice is guided by principles that result in practices.  If you're keen to learn more, please tune into my podcast, Personal Reflections on Appeciative Voice – PS72.

 

When is the Best Time to Improve Presentation Skills? – PS67

Episode Introduction

In this show, we talk about how to improve presentation skills, and, as my guest, Dustin Mathews is a truly excellent marketer, I take the opportunity to focus specifically on his gifts and talents as a marketer, business builder, coach and mentor in building a business that trains others in the art of presentation skills from nuts to bolts, even if those attending his events are already experienced public speakers.  

Episode Background

By way of background, Dustin Mathews is the co-founder of Speaking Empire – a global business that empowers leaders to communicate powerfully, unlock their fullest potential and ultimately step into their greatness in service of others. From personal experience, Speaking Empire does that in a Dustin Mathews - Improve Presentation Skillsnumber of ways, and the corner stone is the art of being able to design and deliver a powerful presentation to any given audience –  for profitable results.

I might say there are many kinds of presentations.  They come in different formats, styles, have different purposes, tones and are delivered on a variety of platforms.  If you are a consultant, trainer, speaker, author, facilitator, or coach and you’re designing and delivering presentations for stage, for classrooms, for clients, for money, for charity, because you love it or because that’s your job, Dustin Mathews has a lot to offer all of us on the topic of improving presentation skills.  His latest book,  co-authored with Dan Kennedy is .called No B.S. Guide to Powerful Presentations is now available.  Check out the link below!

Presentation Skills – How you Show Up

Dustin goes beyond the view that there are many kinds of presentations.  His perspective: everything in life is a presentation.  He goes so far as to say, it’s how you show up in life – whatever, wherever the  opportunity: in a boardroom, on the web, networking, hanging out with others says something about you and how you show up in life.

Start with the End in Mind

A great tip to improve presentation skills is to ask what's the outcome that I want to happen?  Dustin knew nothing about psychology or motivation when he started. He was into science and mathematics. However, once he started to see people taking action based on a message that resonated and invited them to take action, he became hooked on learning more about marketing and learning to do more of what worked.

Every Presentation is an Invitation Take Action

Inviting your audience to take action is a great frame to hold up to the message you are passionate about and have worked hard to bring to life.  You want to be of service and create transformation in your world, and Dustin is clear if you see lights go off in people’s head and let it pass, you are doing a disservice to you and your audience.  

What does “taking action” look like in your world ?  Might it be having your tribe volunteer some time, donate to charity, sign up to your list, buy your service,  ask for a meeting , join facebook community, subscribe to your blog, join your mastermind group?  What else?

To Improve Presentation Skills Invites a Marketing Mindset

Thinking about Improve Presentation SkillsListen into Dustin as he offers great suggestions that come from his marketing background. A presentation starts way in advance of actually delivering the presentation – what ever way you chose to deliver it – on stage, in a boardroom, on a webinar, on a conference call, in an introductory meeting.    

He suggests that you plan well in advance about what can be done prior to delivery in order to connect to your audience;  what you do during the presentation and then what you do afterwards.  Each of these steps helps in developing a stronger relationship with the audience and they become more familiar with you.  Two questions to ask yourself can help in that preparation:

  1. How can I influence?

  2. How can I have multiple touch points?

Improve Presentation Skills to Have Impact on the World

Here's another question to ask yourself:  What specialized knowledge do I have to share with the world?  If my message can help even one person and make a difference in their life, that’s the spark that makes it all worthwhile.  That’s the transformation that inspires me to do more  – to have impact on the world so I can go out and help others

Strengths and Talents

Inviting Dustin to talk about his strengths and talents brought out stories which is always the best way to get to know people more intimately and connect more deeply.   Dustin reveals there was a pattern that when he was challenged to step outside his comfort zone, it was his opportunity for greatest learning, propelling him to the next level.  This might not be an uncommon finding, yet in those uncomfortable experiences, he continues to learn more about himself.  He’s learnt that he’s driven by curiosity – he’s tenacious and when he came to discover his love of marketing, he became aware that he had moved beyond curiosity to fascination.  He was fascinated by all the different worlds and the different words people connect with.  Marketing became his passion and he’s been able to elevate that passion to include it into presentation skills trainings.

The Irresistible Offer Architecture™

Temptation to eat cake - Improve Presentation SkillsThe Irresistible Offer Architecture™ is one of Dustin’s great innovations.  Listen in to Dustin as he explains how his Irresistible Offer Architecture™ helps  shape powerful presentations that result in audiences taking action.  It’s a template which helps speakers create an offer in such a way that delivers greater value to their audiences.  In a nutshell, you don’t just limit your offer to one thing.  He teaches you to gift your audience other related tools and technologies.  These gifts could be in the form of a book, a white paper,  a checklist in your area of expertise.  Even if they never do business with you, you have given them something, 

Positive Mindset

As Dustin explains, behind the Irresistible offer is the belief that if you put more out there, you’re going to be taken care of in the long term.

In closing comments, Dustin reminds us to get into the habit of taking one small action every day as a way to grow capacity and skills and whatever else you might want to bring into your life.  With repetition, the habit gathers a momentum which grows and grows to the point where it becomes easy and life is enriched.  This is what we say in the world of Appreciative Inquiry : What you focus on, grows, so grow toward your best!

How to Connect to Dustin

Dustin's websites:  Dustin Mathews and Speaking Empire

Dustin on Twitter

Dustin on Google+ 

Dustin on Facebook

Dustin on LinkedIn

Samples of  Dustin's Writings

In Entrepreneur Magazine:

4 Ways to Make An Irresistible Offer Without Selling

6 Foolproof Methods to Fearless Public Speaking

Dustin's Latest Book

Let's Stay Connected

It's always great to hear from you. Please connect with me to ask questions or leave comments about this episode or the podcast in general, and there are several good ways to do this:

  • Share your questions and ideas on the Podcast Feedback page
  • Leave a voice message here, and we may feature your question on an upcoming episode
  • Leave a comment on the show notes below

Help Spread the Message of Positivity!

I would be extremely appreciative if you would subscribe, rate or review our Positivity Strategist podcast. Your ratings and comments will help a lot to spread the message! Here is a guide to writing a quick review, click on iTunes and Stitcher.

Listen to Stitcher

Subscribe-iTunes-180x120

Listen on Google Play Music

Subscribe Via RSS

If this episode was helpful or enjoyable to you,

  • I invite you to share it using the social media buttons on the bottom of this page.
  • I'd love it if you can leave a quick review, on iTunes and Stitcher.

Being an Optimist is a Practical Pursuit – PS66

Episode Introduction – Meet David the Optimist

My guest is David the Optimist, David Mitran, from Craiova in Romania.  We talk about David’s goal of writing a book which will be a practical guide to optimism and how he plans to do the research, fund it and release to the world.  How David became a guest on my show is a fun story and we take it from there.

Episode Background

Recently, I received a message via the contact form on my website. This is what it said:

Hello Robyn

Optimist - David with IceCreamMy name is David and I’ve always been an optimist. I’ve always been unapologetic about my positive view of the world.

Recently, I've started an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign. My purpose is to meet strangers from all over Europe and discover a practical formula for optimism.

I'll share the formula with the world by writing a book.

If you want to support my mission (with a donation or even a share on social media) you can do it here: http://igg.me/at/optimist-journey

If you have any questions, please let me know.

Thank you for reading my message,
David

What do you think my response might have been?  I smiled and thought what fun.  What name, It came from David the Optimist!

Being an Optimist Comes from Connection with Others

In checking out the Indiegogo link, what really spoke me were the words he had highlighted: the interaction with other people in his description of his intention and purpose of his embarking on a journey as an optimist. In his research to date, one thing became clear: to be an optimist comes from connection with others.  It’s not an event or a series of events.  It is about choosing to live a lifestyle.

That insight, that awareness was what did it for me. We are not alone in the world and we need others for our health and wellbeing, to be our best selves.  My interest was piqued. I wanted to hear more from David.

What Does Being an Optimist Really Mean for Others?

Listen in to the show to learn how David started this journey; why optimism; why the Indiegogo crowdsourcing campaign; and, find out his plans to use the funds to write a practical guide to help people decide if being an optimist is for them, and if so, how they can achieve such a state.

Optimist - lights with battery levelsWhile his own story of seeking to overcome frustrations was the catalyst that helped him identify what being an optimist is for him, that was not enough.  He wants to learn what it means for others. His is driven by learning about other people’s perspectives and find out what being an optimist means for them.

Experience is the Greatest Teacher

We talk about having the rigor and disciplines of theory and science to back up hypotheses and intuitions, and for David, personal experience and empirical data counts, as we are all unique and we respond and make sense of our worlds in different ways.  

Being confined to his home town, Craiova in Romania will not open up for him the kinds of experiences he seeks in coming up with a practical blueprint for living the life of an optimist.  His best learning to date has been application of what he has read and watched on the internet and from local people.  

I shared that in my work with Appreciative Inquiry, I design experiences to enable people to share their stories that invite respectful listening across all perspectives to deepen connection.

Open Questions that Invite Stories

David’s method is to find talented people and ask two open questions:

  1. How did you start?
  2. How much work did you put into your activity?

He then listens to their stories.

David’s premise is that talent and strength grow from putting in the hard work, the effort, the hours.  It’s about practice and repetition. He’s proven it for himself in working to overcome his personal frustrations and perceived limitations. And that’s his story.  He wants to hear the story of many others in order to come up with a practical guide for optimism.

Taking Action and Sharing with the World

Optimist, David graphicDavid has a great opportunity to put into practice his experience of being an optimist, which is all about taking action. He's walking his talk in taking up the Indiegogo Crowdfunding Campaign.

I was moved by David’s wisdom during our conversation.  He said afterwards he was nervous, as it was his first podcast, and you wouldn’t know it.  His authenticity came through.  

Here’s an example of David the Optimist’s  practical wisdom:

To overcome personal frustrations, I decided to be practical about those frustrations.  That is how I came to discover optimism for myself.  

By acting  on the ideas of others, by reading, observing, asking questions with the purpose of solving my frustrations, I found a way.

As I improved my life, it’s  about taking action in the direction I seek.   To change, you need to take action.

How to Connect to David

David's Indiegogo Campaign The Journey of an Optimist

David's Blog David the Optimist

David on Twitter

David on Facebook

David on Instagram

David on LinkedIn

Samples of David's Writings

Do check out his blog and the following on Amazon:


Let's Stay Connected

It's always great to hear from you. Please connect with me to ask questions or leave comments about this episode or the podcast in general, and there are several good ways to do this:

  • Share your questions and ideas on the Podcast Feedback page
  • Leave a voice message here, and we may feature your question on an upcoming episode
  • Leave a comment on the show notes below

Help Spread the Message of Positivity!

I would be extremely appreciative if you would subscribe, rate or review our Positivity Strategist podcast. Your ratings and comments will help a lot to spread the message! Here is a guide to writing a quick review, click on iTunes and Stitcher.

 

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  • I'd love it if you can leave a quick review, on iTunes and Stitcher.

Eleven Helpful Posts on Being Resilient

Being Resilient Seems of the Time

I’m not sure if it’s my current state of being, my generation, or the Zeitgeist tapping into our collective consciousness, because a curiosity around “resilience” just keeps coming up for me.

Being resilient as a human being, as a citizen, as a community builder and a facilitator helping others find their own resilience, I personally feel a need to dig a little deeper into what it means to be resilient and consider how one might develop the capacity.

I feel blessed, as the worldviews of Appreciative Inquiry (AI) and Open Space inform who I am and what I do.  The Principles of Appreciative Inquiry and the science of positive emotions help to reframe many problems into opportunities and roadblocks into possibilities.  Open Space helps us make sense of complexity and chaos, knowing that all systems are self-organizing and out of chaos order emerges.

Paradoxes Keep us Vigilant and Open to Learning

Being Resilient - Pebble on BeachWe are living in transformational times. We’re continuously developing as human beings and our consciousness is also evolving to ever higher spheres. While history is witness to such progress, so does it also remind us that contradictions are ever present. The paradoxes serve to keep us vigilant and open to learning. Even though violence and suffering confront us in the world, our capacity to focus on possibilities and hope is equally available.

I remember as a student at Sydney University studying Marxism and Feminism in my Philosophy class, I went to my tutor deeply deeply conflicted because I truly appreciated the worldviews of these two “… isms” in my life, and, at the same time, I really enjoyed my capitalist lifestyle, wearing makeup and a bra. My tutor counseled me: being aware of the contradictions was what mattered. What decisions I make and actions I take is on me.

Overcoming Adversity

When faced with challenges, whether through personal loss, tragedy, illness or environmental factors, most of us, of healthy mind, find ways to recover and move on. We can find inspiration in the stories of others overcoming adversity to find joy, satisfaction and meaning in life despite incredible odds. You may be aware of inspiring individuals in your own circles; and there are well-known public figures, for example, Oprah Winfrey, Steve Jobs, Franklin Roosevelt, Viktor Frankl, whose stories of overcoming adversity show how being resilient has been a strong factor in their flourishing.

Appreciative Inquiry Interview on “Being Resilient”

Unfortunately, we see in our neighborhoods, or on our screens conflicts, injustices, devastation, waste, and suffering that still exist in our worlds, and at the same time we see evidence of people rebuilding their lives, taking actions, forgiving, healing, rising strong with love and hope, seeing beyond the fear and despair.  [As a side, if the topic restorative narratives interests you, please take a take a look and listen to this episode of Positivity Strategist Podcast, with Roberta Baskin.  You'll find a number of online media that focus on restorative narratives to shine the light on how even in pain and suffering, there are many more beautiful stories of hope and resilience and possibility].

To experience an Appreciative Inquiry Interview on the topic of Being Resilient, open the Positivity Lens Reveal below to download the PDF.

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You will reconnect with a time when you experienced being resilient or witnessed resilience in another.  In acknowledging your own experiences, you will find strengths that will help you recognise what capacities and resources you have that will support you to build resilience for any potential set-backs.

Eleven Posts On Being Resilient

As I reflected on the quality of being resilient, I did a little research. Then I decided to share these links, with a quote from each, rather than try to summarize. May they serve you well.

  1. What is Resilience on the American Psychological Association: “Resilience is not a trait that people either have or do not have. It involves behaviors, thoughts, and actions that can be learned and developed in anyone.”
  2. The Road to Resilience published by the American Psychological Association : “Research has shown that resilience is ordinary, not extraordinary. People commonly demonstrate resilience.”
  3. Happiness Unpacked: Positive Emotions Increase Life Satisfaction by Building Resilience by Cohn, Fredrickson et al on US National Library of Medicine “Change in resilience mediated the relation between positive emotions and increased life satisfaction, suggesting that happy people become more satisfied not simply because they feel better, but because they develop resources for living well.”
  4. Building Resilience by Martin Seligman on Harvard Business Review: “We discovered that people who don’t give up have a habit of interpreting setbacks as temporary, local, and changeable. (“It’s going away quickly; it’s just this one situation, and I can do something about it.”)
  5. Measuring Resilience: A Review of 3 Scales on Positive Psychology Program: “It is important to note that most resilience measures have been developed, researched and used in the West and when the scales are applied to the non-western population, validity and reliability issues arise.”
  6. Putting a Positive Spin on a Negative Situation by Laura Hamilton on Psychics Universe “Have you ever noticed that some people even in the face of tragedy still see something positive in the experience?”
  7. The Five Best Was to Build Resiliency by Jessie Sholl on Experience Life: “…receiving and appreciating kindness from others may be just as important as offering it up, because gratitude turns out to be an important part of resiliency…”
  8. Five Science-backed Ways to Build Resilience by Kira M. Newman on Greater Good: “Even for the relatively self-aware and emotionally adept, struggles can take us by surprise. But learning healthy ways to move through adversity—a collection of skills that researchers call resilience—can help us cope better and recover more quickly, or at least start heading in that direction.”
  9. How to Develop your Resilience on WikiHow to do anything:  “Increasing your resilience can be attained by coping healthfully with difficult emotions and situations, engaging in resilient actions, thinking resiliently, and maintaining your resilience in the long-term.”
  10. Resilience at Work by Barry Winbolt:  “The key here is that resilience is not a passive quality, but an active process. How we approach life, and everything it can throw at us, has a massive impact on our experience.”
  11. Inspiring Stories of Resilience by Chris Johnstone on Positive.News:  “What is it that helps resilience happen? For each person there may be choices they make, resources they turn to, strengths they draw upon or insights they apply.”

I'd love for you to share your story or thoughts on the topic of “being resilient” in the comments section below.

Students and Business Leaders Hook up to be a Force for Good, with Roberta Baskin – PS58

Episode Introduction

Award winning journalist, Roberta Baskin is a most distinguished guest on Positivity Strategist podcast.  Roberta has had a stellar career in investigative journalism with more than 75 journalism awards both print and TV, including prestigious Peabodys, duPont Columbia Awards, and multiple Emmys.  During this time of global reporting, there was a stirring within: a shift that has brought Roberta to where she is today, Executive Director of AIM2Flourish.

Episode Overview – Business as a Force for Good

Roberta Baskin on Force for GoodAIM2Flourish is a non-profit organization, founded at Case Western Reserve University, whose mission is to accelerate the shift to a Business for Good mindset by recognizing the positive impact of today’s business leaders, and changing the way tomorrow’s leaders are taught.  What is so exciting about AIM2Flourish is that these future business leaders get out of the classroom into businesses that are doing good and positively working towards achieving any one of the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals with a target date of 2030.

It’s as if Roberta had been preparing for this new role during her entire journalistic career.  Her investigations, during her time as a journalist, resulted in making beer healthier, exposing sweatshops in the shoe and soccer industries, uncovering pediatric dental abuses, and succeeding in banning dangerous products.

Did You Discover Appreciative Inquiry or Did Appreciative Inquiry Discover you?

Whenever my guests come from the world of Appreciative Inquiry (AI), I invite this question: Did you discover Appreciative Inquiry, or did Appreciative Inquiry discover you.  You’ll love Roberta’s quirky answer. (She’s very playful by nature, having enjoyed her company at a number of Appreciative Inquiry gatherings).  As a recovering journalist, Roberta offers that she needed to do the AI Certification twice, because she was programmed to focus on the bad stuff in the world.  Her default mindset was conditioned to find out “what’s wrong?” in situations rather than “What’s possible?” What a 360 turn!  When she met Appreciative Inquiry thought leader, David Cooperrider, her worldview flipped, as does most people’s when they discover AI, and/or meet with Professor Cooperrider.

Restorative Narratives

It's very encouraging to hear Roberta offer examples of media organizations that are focusing on the best of humanity even in the worst of times.  Journalists who report on tragic circumstances in ways that restore hope, resilience and possibilities that lift up the human spirit to inspire us all.   Restorative narratives shine the light on how even in pain and suffering, there are beautiful stories of hope and resilience and possibility.

Examples of generative journalism can be found in Images and Voice of Hope, Constructive Journalism Project, Solutions Journalism Network, Axiom News and Huffington Post has a What's Working Section.

Changing Business Education by Changing the Story of Business

If we hold the belief that business can be a force for good, how might we change the way colleges and universities teach business skills?  Instead of the same old traditional curriculum, we might inquire into the biggest global issues facing businesses today and create innovative partnerships and experiences for students to learn actively from personal experience rather than passively through books and the internet.

Organizations who value innovation, longevity and human flourishing as strategic imperatives,  demonstrate that their financial bottom line is so interconnected with our planet’s and people’s well-being.

Developing Leaders for 21st Century

AIM2Flourish partners with professors in business schools around the world with materials to help their students research, and engage in conversations with innovative business leaders, and begin to conceive potential solutions that will not only advance business goals, but also address the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals.

The 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals provide such an opportunity for business students to work on real issues such as ending poverty and hunger, shifting to clean energy, controlling climate change and working for peace.  All this is possible.  Our collective conscious has awakened to our global oneness.  We are all in this together.

Being a Force for Good Benefits all Stakeholders

AIM2Flourish is the world’s first global action-learning platform showcasing business innovation that tackle some of our biggest challenges. Founded at Case Western Reserve University, business students across the globe use Appreciative Inquiry framed questions (AIM = Appreciative Inquiry Method) to search out and report on golden innovations that address the 17 UN Global Goals.

As a participating business, the benefits are many:  brand reputation; being aligned with purpose-driven students; aligning with other leaders in the social responsibility space;  recognition as a positive change agent in the world and providing solutions to some of the world’s greatest challenges.

AIM2Flourish Stories and Ways to Participate

As you listen to Roberta, you will be inspired by students’ stories.  I encourage you to go to AIM2Flourish.com,  join up and participate in being a force for good.  The students and the companies that are being showcased will appreciate it and you’ll feel great about your contribution.

AIM2Flourish logo Force for GoodIf you wish to participate more actively, please reach out to Roberta. Her links are provided below.

Accept Roberta’s invitation to create your own profile on AIM2Flourish.

Contribute to the Sightings page.  Here's an opportunity to write up an innovation you are aware of that may help students explore more.

You, your family, community or organization  can become part of the global improvement movement to achieve the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 – only 14 years away.

AIM2Flourish is housed at the Fowler Center for Business as an Agent of World Benefit in Case Western Reserve University's Weatherhead School of Management.

Links Mentioned

Website:  AIM2Flourish

Twitter: AIM2Flourish

LinkedIn: Roberta Baskin

Facebook: AIM2Flourish

Roberta on Wikipedia

Fowler Center for Business as an Agent of World Benefit

Recent Articles by Roberta

1) Huffington Post blog: Business 101: AIM2Flourish 

2) Kosmos Journal: AIM2Flourish

3) AIM2Flourish Blog 

Let's Stay Connected

It's always great to hear from you. Please connect with me to ask questions or leave comments about this episode or the podcast in general, and there are several good ways to do this:

  • Share your questions and ideas on the Podcast Feedback page
  • Leave a voice message here, and we may feature your question on an upcoming episode
  • Leave a comment on the show notes below

Help Spread the Message of Positivity!

I would be extremely appreciative if you would subscribe, rate or review our Positivity Strategist podcast. Your ratings and comments will help a lot to spread the message! Here is a guide to writing a quick review, click on iTunes and Stitcher.

 

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Listen on Google Play Music

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If this episode was helpful or enjoyable to you,

  • I invite you to share it using the social media buttons on the bottom of this page.
  • I'd love it if you can leave a quick review, on iTunes and Stitcher.

Ability to Dream Influences your Destiny

When it comes to bringing positive change into your life, it might start as a wish, or an aspiration, or a dream.  We know from history, some of the biggest dreamers have created the most lasting positive social changes. The ability to dream allows for anything to be possible.  Imagining a desirable future is what keeps us going,

The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.

– Eleanor Roosevelt

In the work I do as a change agent, whether as a coach with individuals or a consultant in a community or an organization, early in the process I seek to inspire every individual to see themselves in a new dream.

Ability to Dream

Ability to Dream Accepting we have the ability to dream big and bold, how to act on your dream is what comes next. Appreciative Inquiry, the transformation change method I teach and practice provides a beautiful framework to bring dreams to life – not only individual dreams, but also collective dreams.

Collective Dreams

Some of my most personally rewarding, professional experiences are in designing and facilitating teams or community groups to dream their future.  They may not be aware that's what they are doing at the start of an project, but as they follow the process, that's what they discover – they all have dreams of how they want their work to be, their communities to be, their worlds to be.  From a place of deep listening to one another, people discover a sense of union with each other and that there is also something larger.

Appreciative Questions

David Cooperrider is creator of the transformational change methodology, Appreciative Inquiry. Professor Cooperrider has worked with the Dalai Lama, Heads of States from all over the world and with top business leaders. He explains:

Appreciative Inquiry is a way of designing questions that allows us to dream and devise big ideas together, instead of focusing on problems.  It can quickly bring out the best in people and has been adopted by businesses worldwide.

Dream is in fact the 3rd step in the Appreciative Inquiry methodology.

As an example, in a planning session, here are some of the questions, I might invite participants to engage in:

  • What is important to you about being here today? 
  • What does this project means to you and the community?
  • How might you bring your strengths and talents to this project?
  • What opportunities exist and who will benefit?
  • What most excites you about this project?
  • What three wishes do you have for this project?

Inner Work happens before the Outer Work

These questions tap into peoples' values, their gifts and talents, their aspirations, their emotions, and their dreams (wishes).  In these conversations, people listen and learn.   As they find interdependencies, they tap into their creativity. The possibilities of being able to share a dream is more likely than they may have at first considered.  In fact, they are doing inner work while they are also committing to outer work.

 If you are interested to learn more about how I do this work, please take a look at my Services Page.

Meaningful Conversations can Transform You and Your World

Episode Introduction

In this episode, my guest is Jacqueline Botting, the founder of WiseTribe.us.  Jacqueline reached out to me after discovering Appreciative Inquiry, buying my book, Appreciative Inquiry for Collaborative Solutions: 21 Strength-Based Workshops, and engaging me to work with her fledgling non-profit startup. We have been working and playing together ever since. I invited Jacqueline to share her story of how and why she started Wisetribe.us.

Episode Overview –  Meaningful Conversations Can Transform You and Your World

For Jacqueline Botting, it starts with a personal quest to search for greater meaning in her own life. Valuing the time in which we’re living, Jacqueline’s revelation is that we are dawning on The Collaborative Age. At this time, when we are experiencing enormous cultural and technological changes, we possesses tremendous potential to enhance our collective social well-being. Through carefully designed experiences, WiseTribe connects people of diverse ages, ethnicities, and professions to share strengths, dreams, possibilities  and convert them into action-based learning projects.

Search for Meaningful Conversations and Relationships

As you listen to Jacqueline share parts of her story, you’ll become aware that meaningful conversation and relationships are the big themes in Jacqueline’s story.meaningful conversations

It was the passing of her father, or the time that led up to his death that awakened Jacqueline to the realization that a successful life, or a life well-lived, is not only about getting ahead merely in the material or professional sense.  Jacqueline discovered in conversation with her father in the last years of his life that all he really wanted was to have meaningful relationships and conversations.  

Jacqueline became aware that she was running her life to a similar script as her father:  all the trappings, material things, good career opportunities and even marriage didn’t add up to make her feel whole or complete.

Her father’s vulnerability and their deep meaningful conversations moved Jacqueline to begin to examine her own live.  The confluence of many events – perhaps synchronicities – lead her to connect to people who were often much older than she was: and she was discovering similar stories, namely, towards the end of life, what counts is having healthy, high-functioning, meaningful conversations and relationships.  

Transformative Experience

In these conversations with older people, Jacqueline was not only tapping into their wisdom, but finding her own deep wisdom. She was learning that a life not well-lived resulted in a life of emptiness, a life unfulfilled. She felt compelled to recalibrate and re-think what it means to live in a human centric world that was beyond material possessions and status.

WiseTribe

WiseTribe, the organization Jacqueline founded was born out of the idea of generations wiser together. And this is when I was brought in to help design a range of “products” to help market this concept.  Overtime, it became clear that these “products” were experiences where invited participants could share their personal stories, passions, dreams and possibilities for a wiser, human centric world, based on collective social well-being.

Discovering Appreciative Inquiry 

Appreciative Inquiry (AI) first became know to Jacqueline when when did a search for the term “collective actualization.”  She came across an article by David Cooperrider, thought leader of Appreciative Inquiry, and it was as if she had come home.  The worldview and practice of AI felt so aligned to WiseTribe’s vision and mission, she knew she had to learn more.  She wanted to create spaces and experiences for people to share the wisdom of their lives and their insights and interests to create something new.

Contrasting the Traditional Worldview with the Appreciative Worldview.

We are moving beyond personal mastery to collective mastery.  Technology has become a great enabler and democratizer.  You might like to open up the Positive Lens Reveal to read some of the distinctions between the old and the new ways of experiencing the world.  

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As you take a look at these slides, which worldview occupies most of your energy?   When we start to pay attention to our own worldview and those around us, we expand.  We are not alone in this world. We are interconnected.  The language we use creates the worlds we live into.   What if we were to consciously change our language so we together we create a new narrative.   People are not problems to be solved, but mysteries to be embraced.
meaningful conversationsmeaningful conversationsmeaningful conversations

The Experience of a WiseTribe Season 

Listen in to Jacqueline as she describes the WiseTribe Collaborative Season.  Briefly, it’s a four part experience.  The inaugural season was a partnership with Florida Atlantic University (FAU).

  1. Connect through Wisdom Exchanges
  2. Co-create in Solutionism Workshops using Design Thinking Process
  3. Collaborate among tribes over their projects
  4. Celebrate with a festival to showcase projects and learnings with artistic performances.

This four month experience is grounded in the principles and practices of Appreciative Inquiry.  Therefore stories, strengths, dreams, play, creativity, art, inspiration, heart and love, as well as commitment to being in relationship and doing good work are abundant.

We experience the value of play which unleashes imagination and spirit thereby leading to innovations that allow us to live in new ways.

Appreciations

In conclusion, I invite Jacqueline to reflect on her own strengths in bringing her vision to life.  It’s a joy to hear how clear she is about her talents.  Having been a thinking partner with Jacqueline, I am so proud to hear describe herself with such confidence and competence.  She has seized many opportunities and through her tenacity and persistence, vision and leadership, she is making a sustainable difference in people’s lives.

Finally, I was very touched when she expresses her appreciation for me and the role I have played in encouraging her and offering support and experience to achieve her dreams.  That's my talent.

It will continue to be a positive co-creative enriching experience for us both.

Connect with Jacqueline

Website: WiseTribe.us and FloridaWise.us

WiseTribe  on Twitter

Jacqueline on LinkedIn

Wisetribe on  on Facebook

WiseTribe on Instagram

Book Mentioned in the Episode


Let's Stay Connected

It's always great to hear from you. Please connect with me to ask questions or leave comments about this episode or the podcast in general, and there are several good ways to do this:

  • Share your questions and ideas on the Podcast Feedback page
  • Leave a voice message here, and we may feature your question on an upcoming episode
  • Leave a comment on the show notes below

Help Spread the Message of Positivity!

I would be extremely appreciative if you would subscribe, rate or review our Positivity Strategist podcast. Your ratings and comments will help a lot to spread the message! Here is a guide to writing a quick review, click on iTunes and Stitcher.

Listen to Stitcher

Subscribe-iTunes-180x120

Listen on Google Play Music

Subscribe Via RSS

If this episode was helpful or enjoyable to you,

  • I invite you to share it using the social media buttons on the bottom of this page.
  • I'd love it if you can leave a quick review, on iTunes and Stitcher.